Handmade Dreamcatchers

Handmade Dreamcatchers

Welcome to Mystical Mayhem Clothing’s range of hippy  dreamcatchers.  Each and every single dream catcher that we sell has been 100% made by hand. When we say 100% we mean 100%.  No machines or magic knitting tables here!
These wonderful dream catchers are made by a team of 12 ladies. These ladies are mostly semi retired now and enjoy sitting and weaving dream catchers whilst watching the world go by. They work from their own homes in Bali Indonesia because this way they can just make the dream catchers as and when they have time around there busy family life. Although they have numbers that they have been requested to make there is no pressure. This is why the ladies enjoy it so much and the reason that each and every one looks amazing as have been made with great care.

The whole point of a dreamcatcher is in the name, it was designed to catch bad dreams. Legends tell that they were originally designed for children to help them with bad dreams. The bad dreams that were caught in the dream catcher would then disappear when the sun came up.
The Dream catcher, when hung moves freely in the air and catches the dreams as they float by. The good dreams know the way and slip through the webbing and slide down off the soft feathers so gently that the sleeper below sometimes hardly knows he is dreaming. The bad dreams not knowing the way get entangled in the webbing and perish in the first light of day.

Our dreamcatchers are made from several different materials including cotton, wicker and suede.  Each dreamcatcher is also decorated with feathers and beads.  Please see the description of each dreamcatcher for material it is made from.

All our Dreamcatchers are handmade in Bali Indonesia 

Traditional Native American Dreamcatchers

In Native American culture, a dreamcatcher ( also known as a “dream snare”) is a handmade object based on a willow hoop, on which is woven a loose net or web. The dreamcatcher is then decorated with personal and sacred items such as feathers and beads or whatever materials had meaning to the specific person or family it was being made for.

Traditionally, the Ojibwa tribes would construct dreamcatchers by tying sinew strands in a web around a small round or tear-shaped frame of willow  The resulting “dream-catcher”, hung above the bed and was used as a charm to protect sleeping people from nightmares.

The Ojibwa believe that a dreamcatcher changes a person’s dreams. Keeping the bad nightmares away only allowing in good pleasant dreams.